Statics on dating violence

This also includes sexual contact with a partner who is intoxicated or drugged and unable to give clear and informed consent.

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This includes hacking a partner’s email account or going through their phone to keep track of who they’re talking to, harassing or threatening via social media, pressuring a girlfriend or sext, or sending repeated and unwanted calls or text messages.

Read our article “It’s a teen issue” to learn more about what Teen Dating Violence looks like.

It's important for parents to know the statistics, the signs that your teen's partner is an abuser, what the cycle of abuse in a relationship looks like, and what to look for if you think your teen is being abused.

has conducted extensive research during the development of its dating violence prevention programs.

Just Say YES speakers connect with middle and high school students through their own personal stories, the latest research and practical, relevant steps to get help.

Contact us to have a Program Coordinator work with you to schedule a teen dating violence program for your school.

Teens use abuse to manipulate and control the other person in the relationship through behaviors ranging from intimidation to severe physical and sexual abuse.

When unchecked, abusive behaviors typically escalate as an abuser gets older, making it essential for teens to get help at the first sign of abuse.

Dating violence is defined as a pattern of controlling or abusive behaviors perpetrated by a current or former dating partner.

Abusers can be male or female, and experts are seeing these patterns of behavior in younger and younger students as pre-teens and elementary students engage in dating relationships before developing healthy relationship skills and boundaries.

Bruises and cuts are one sign to look out for, but it's also important for parents to notice signs of anxiety or depression.

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